IEEE 5G Webinar Series

smallPicWebinarSeriesNewLogoWhiteWe live in exciting times, where the pace of innovation and change is increasing rapidly and can make or break a company’s future in months.  Mobility continues to be a driving force in our economy, as well as our everyday lives.  5G is expected to contribute greater than $100B to the economy within the next ten years; yet there is too little understanding of what it is, what it can do, how it will be used, and what comes next. The objective of the IEEE Future Networks Webinar Series is to expand this understanding and to be the first point of learning for all things related to 5G and beyond. These webinars will be offered around the globe to both IEEE members and non-members.

We are currently looking for knowledgeable subject matter experts to develop and deliver one or more individual webinars.  Our scope includes the business of 5G, 5G enabling technologies and standards, 5G spectrum and regulation, and topics which cover the fundamentals for moving beyond 5G. Please click here to learn more.   


Upcoming Webinar: 

mmWaves in 5G NR Cellular Networks: a System Level Perspective

Wednesday January 23rd 11:00am EST | 10:00am CDT

Presenter

Michele Polese, PhD candidate in Information Engineering

About the Webinar

Communication at mmWave frequencies will play a key role in next generation 5G cellular networks. However, mobile scenarios are the most challenging for mmWave cellular systems, due to the high propagation loss, the relatively small coverage area of individual cells, and rapid channel dynamics caused by blockage events. In this talk, Michele Polese will describe some MAC and network level solutions that can provide a consistent and reliable user experience in mmWave mobile networks. The first part of the talk will focus on beam management and multi connectivity for 3GPP NR. Then, deployment issues will be discussed, with the recent 3GPP Study Item on Integrated Access and Backhaul in the spotlight. Finally, the last part will present a selection of results on the performance of TCP on mmWave links, and of possible algorithms and architectures to improve the end-to-end performance in these networks.

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Future Webinars: 

Networked Electricity

Tuesday February 26th 11:00am EST | 10:00am CDT

Presenter

Bruce Nordman, Research Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

About the Webinar

Internet technology and cellular communications technology have transformed many aspects of how we communicate, and caused us to consider and do things in ways not previously possible or for many even imaginable. 5G and other technology will take us further down this path. Every device that communicates by definition consumes electricity. As we advance communications technologies with new concepts and capabilities, it makes sense to do the same for electricity.

Local Power Distribution (LPD) is a “network model of power”, organized from the bottom-up into nanogrids that can be networked to each other, local generation, and a utility grid. A nanogrid controller contains a battery and provides power to attached end-use devices. The controller establishes a local price that influences device operation, management of internal storage, and exchanges of power with other controllers, sources, and the grid. All power connections are digitally managed and plug-and-play. LPD is intended for all application contexts, whether a utility grid is present always, never, or intermittently.

Future communications devices will exist in a variety of power contexts, from those that are stand-alone but grid-connected, stand-alone without a grid connection, or internal to a building with power available from that building. Many of these may be connected to local renewable generation, and for reliability and other purposes, all will include at least some amount of energy storage. In some countries, grid power is routinely unreliable. A generic technology solution which allows for base stations to automatically adapt to any and changing power contexts can reduce costs, increase efficiencies, improve performance, and enable more use of renewables and storage. It can also enable more graceful system degradation when power is in short supply.

As with Internet technology, we not only want new electrical technology to operate in different ways internally, we want users to think about electricity differently with new capabilities.


Security in SDN/NFV and 5G Networks – Opportunities and Challenges

Tuesday March 26th 11:00am EST | 10:00am CDT

Presenter

Ashutosh Dutta, Senior Wireless Communication Systems Research Scientist, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Labs (JHU/APL)

About the Webinar

Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Function Virtualization (NFV) are the key pillars of future networks, including 5G and Beyond that promise to support emerging applications such as enhanced mobile broadband, ultra low latency, massive sensing type applications while providing the resiliency in the network. Service providers and other verticals (e.g., Connected Cars, IOT, eHealth) can leverage SDN/NFV to provide flexible and cost-effective service without compromising the end user quality of service (QoS). While NFV and SDN open up the door for flexible networks and rapid service creation, these offer both security opportunities while also introducing additional challenges and complexities, in some cases.

With the rapid proliferation of 4G and 5G networks, operators have now started the trial deployment of network function virtualization, especially with the introduction of various virtualized network elements in the access and core networks. These include elements such as virtualized Evolved Packet Core (vEPC), virtualized IP Multimedia Services (vIMS), Virtualized Residential Gateway, and Virtualized Next Generation Firewalls. However, very little attention has been given to the security aspects of virtualization. While several standardization bodies (e.g., ETSI, 3GPP, NGMN, ATIS, TIA) have started looking into the many security issues introduced by SDN/NFV, additional work is needed with larger security community involvement including vendors, operators, universities, and regulators.

This tutorial will address evolution of cellular technologies towards 5G but will largely focus on various security challenges and opportunities introduced by SDN/NFV and 5G networks such as Hypervisor, Virtual Network Functions (VNFs), SDN Controller, Orchestrator, Network slicing, Cloud RAN, and security function virtualization. This tutorial will also highlight some of the ongoing activities within various standards communities and will illustrate a few deployment use case scenarios for security including threat taxonomy for both operator and enterprise networks. In addition, I will also describe some of the ongoing activities within IEEE Future Network initiative including roadmap efforts and various ways one can get involved and contribute to this initiative.


Webinars on Demand: 

Mitigating Thermal & Power Limitations to Enable 5G

Presenter

Dr. Earl McCune, CTO, Eridan Communications

About the Webinar

3GPP has defined 5G-NR with a modulation that inherently reduces energy efficiency of linear transmitters. This causes thermal problems from the dissipated power, which is a particular difficulty for massive-MIMO arrays. Temperature rise from transmitter power dissipation limits the array size that can be safely built. Achieving the multiple business objectives for 5G installations requires solving this problem, and using Sampling technologies is showing great promise to meeting this goal. This presentation presents the physical basis of this thermal problem, and shows how the sampling operation of the switch-mode mixer modulator (SM3) solves not only the thermal problem but also how, using the SM3, signal bandwidth efficiency is increased to 14 bits per symbol (16,384-QAM) with modulation within 0.5% of ideal.

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Leading the World to 5G and its Expansion to New Industries

Presenter

Dr. John Smee, Vice President, Engineering, Qualcomm Technologies, Inc.

About the Webinar

5G is a unifying connectivity fabric that will connect virtually everything around us, expanding the reach of mobile to new services, applications, deployments, and spectrum types. Today, we are preparing for the first commercial launches of 5G NR, which is based on Release 15 of the 3GPP global standard, and it will usher in many new and enhanced mobile experiences starting in 2019. In parallel, we are also evolving 5G NR to expand into new industries, such as automotive and industrial IoT. Join this webinar to:

  • See where we are on the path to make 5G NR a commercial reality
  • Understand what is at the foundation of 5G NR Release 15 for enabling new and improved applications
  • Learn what’s coming in Release 16 and beyond that will expand 5G into new industries

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5G Spectrum Sharing: A Network Economics View

Presenter

Randall Berry, Lorraine Morton Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University

About the Webinar

Utilizing novel forms of spectrum is a key enabler for meeting the needs of 5G. Examples include shared spectrum as in the CBRS framework and and tighter integration of unlicensed and licensed spectrum. These approach will impact not only the technical performance of networks but the economic incentives of service providers as they make decisions about what technologies to deploy and how they compete. This talk will examine several of these issues and discuss network economic models that can be used to gain insight into them.

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Small Cells and Their Role in Future 5G Networks

Presenters

Dr. David Lopez-Perez, Senior Research Engineer, Nokia Bell Laboratories and Michael Kinnavy, Head of Small Cell R&D, Nokia Bell Laboratories

About the Webinar

In this tutorial, we review the 4G small cell use cases, technology concept, deployment aspects and lessons learnt in the field, paying special attention to inter-cell interference issues and more. Moreover, we discuss the technology evolution of small cells towards 5G, and introduce the concept of ultra-dense networks. We carefully explain how ultra-dense networks are different from those sparse or less dense ones in 4G, and depict their main benefits and challenges. Theoretical and system-level simulation based results are used to shed new light in all these concepts.

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5G and the GDPR – Just Because You Can Capture Data Does Not Mean You Can Use It

Presenters

Dr. Alison Knight PhD, - University of Southampton (UK) Senior Legal Adviser

Gary LaFever, Anonos - CEO & Co-Founder

Abstract

5G technologies will make it possible to interconnect with billions of devices and sensors globally, further fueling the growth of large scale dynamic decentralized/distributed data processing business models. These dynamic models will generate significant business opportunities as well as potential liabilities from failure to comply with centralized data protection requirements like those under the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The GDPR, which goes into effect on May 25, 2018, includes fines as high as 4% of annual global gross revenues for data controllers and processors who fail to satisfy its requirements. Learn how new dynamic data protection requirements under the GDPR can help to resolve these conflicts and help to facilitate adoption of 5G capabilities.

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The Future of IoT

Presenter

Don DeLoach, Co-Chair, Midwest IoT Council

About the Webinar

As the Internet of Things moves closer and closer to mainstream, and the potential impact on our organizations becomes clearer, the challenges uncovered through numerous pilots and early production systems are becoming clear as well. In his presentation, Don will explore these challenges that often have less to do with technology, and more to do with people, organizations, architecture, and somewhat nuanced but no less critical considerations of security, privacy, and data ownership. The challenges in moving from early stages of the Internet of Things into mainstream production can demand a broad level of understanding and thoughtful leadership in order to truly leverage IoT’s value in a resilient manner.

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5G Drives Major Paradigm Shifts for Power

Presenter

Brian Zahnstecher, Principal, PowerRox

About the Webinar

The 5G network promises massive bandwidths and low latencies, but none will come to fruition without major paradigm shifts in network power architecture/distribution/utilization.  5G is a unique case study because it brings together many cutting-edge aspects of today’s cloud-focused world.  It is dependent on cohesion from the edge to the core network with the latest in data center technology (i.e. – Software-defined/virtualized everything).  In between, there are heterogeneous networks of small cells operating in licensed/unlicensed spectrum via massive multi-input multi-output (MIMO) arrays of antennas required to enable millimeter wave transmission for billions of users.

Power is the absolute gatekeeper for enabling 5G whether it be precise management of smartphone battery usage/charging, envelope tracking signals to optimize efficiency for the power amplifier (PA) at either ends, or intelligent power management in the data center to allow for unprecedented volumes of data processing/transmission to occur in footprints practical enough to sit around neighborhoods.

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Massive MIMO for 5G below 6 GHz: Achieving Spectral Efficiency, Link Reliability, and Low-Power Operation

Presenter

Emil Björnson, Associate Professor, Linköping University

About the Webinar

5G, the next generation of wireless networks, needs to accommodate massive data traffic, large user numbers, high reliability, and yet provide great energy efficiency. When talking about 5G-enabling technologies, there is much fuss about millimeter wave communications, which is the ideal approach for delivering high data rates over short distances. However, the mmWave operation is inherently unreliable and unsuitable for wide-area coverage. To satisfy all the 5G requirements, we also need to make major improvements in the network operation at conventional cellular frequency bands, below 6 GHz.

Massive MIMO is the name of multiantenna technologies that use access points with hundreds of antenna elements. Massive MIMO was conceived as the way to deliver very high spectral efficiency in bands below 6 GHz, using spatial multiplexing of tens of users per cell. In recent years, Massive MIMO has gone from being a mind-blowing theoretical concept to one of the most promising 5G-enabling technologies; several world records in spectral efficiency have been set by Massive MIMO testbeds. The use of arrays with many antennas creates the phenomenon of channel hardening, which means that the rapid fading variations that normally haunt wireless links are averaged out, leading to high link reliability. Furthermore, the array gain provided by the directive transmissions allow for reduced transmit powers, which is an enabler for low-power nodes.

In this talk, I will explain the basics of Massive MIMO and the importance of implementing it in the right way in order to reap all the benefits that the technology can deliver. I will exemplify how to achieve high spectral efficiency, great link reliability, and low-power operation.

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5G Technology Is Fantastic, But Can We Afford It?

Presenter

Professor William Webb, CEO Webb Search

About the Webinar

The 5G community has set out a beguiling vision of a communications network that is faster, higher capacity, lower latency and able to manage a wide diversity of traffic. But achieving this will require massive investment in small cells, backhaul, new core networks, mobile edge computing and much more. This comes at a time when mobile operators are mostly seeing revenue fall and profitability reduce and are cutting back on investment as a result. 5G proponents are looking to enterprise for new revenue streams, but is this feasible and are there alternatives such as dense Wi-Fi and standalone IoT solutions that could deliver more cost-effectively? This webinar will look at the economics behind 5G and show that there are funding gaps to bridge in many areas.

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5G and Satellite Spectrum and Standards

Presenter

Geoff Varrall, Director RTT Programmes

About the Webinar

A 40 minute webinar on 5G and satellite spectrum and standards reviewing existing WRC 2019 bands identified for 5G and their compatibility/coexistence with GSO, LEO and MEO Ku, K and Ka band satellite spectrum, summary of NEW LEO constellation capabilities including OneWeb and Space X and LEOSAT, spectrum sharing and frequency reuse opportunities implicit in progressive pitch angular power separation and the potential implications for 5G co sharing of satellite K band spectrum, pass bands and channel bandwidth compatibility and physical layer coexistence, present tension points between the NEWLEO entities and incumbent LEO and MEO and GSO operators, the link budget and long distance latency benefits of nearly always nearly overhead (NANO) connectivity when integrated with inter satellite switching, how this could help meet specific 5G vertical market throughput and latency requirements, satellite IOT, present and future technical and commercial trends and standards issues and related 5G and satellite regulatory challenges and opportunities, longer term V and W band co sharing opportunities.

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5G mmWave Revolution and New Radio

Presenter

Amitabha (Amitava) Ghosh, Nokia Fellow and Head, Small Cell Research at Nokia Bell Labs

About the Webinar

The first phase of standardization of 5G cellular systems is currently underway covering bands up to 52.6 GHz while the next phase will cover bands up to 100 GHz. Due to the availability of large bandwidths at mmWave frequencies (20 GHz-100 GHz) the 5G requirements of greater than 10 Gbps of peak rate and edge rates greater than 100 Mbps for extreme mobile broadband (eMBB) applications can be met using a simple air-interface design and high dimension phased arrays. The mmWave systems also face inherent challenges, such as a high penetration loss, a higher sensitivity to blockage and diminished diffraction, which the system must overcome.

In this talk, a comprehensive view of mmWave technology will be discussed. Firstly, mmWave challenges and propagation characteristics will be presented with some compelling use cases. Next, the availability of spectrum at mmWave frequencies will be discussed followed by comprehensive description of 5G new radio (NR) interface. Massive MIMO is one of the key features since at mmWave frequencies coverage enhancing solutions are essential to compensate for the higher path-loss. Massive MIMO technology @ mmWave will be discussed along with system performance results. The system performance will cover early use case for pre-5G commercial systems, namely, providing high speed fixed access wireless data service to residential customers in suburban neighborhoods. The effect of foliage, power, ISD, SU/MU MIMO on system performance will also be presented. Finally, some field results on early Proof-of-Concept (PoC) mmWave systems will be presented.

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A Look at the Companies and Organizations Working to Make 5G a Commercial Success

Presenter

Daryl Schoolar, Practice Leader Next Generation Infrastructure, Ovum

About the Webinar

Ecosystem is everything when it comes to mobile. Without a robust ecosystem wireless standards rarely have commercial success. This webinar examines some of the key players in the ecosystem working to make 5G a success. Ecosystem review will include operator deployment plans, standards development and the groups behind those developments, and key vendor activity.  

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5G: What is it and What New Applications are Driving its Formation?

Presenter

Robert W. Heath Jr., Ph.D., P.E., IEEE Fellow and Cullen Trust Endowed Professor, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin

About the Webinar

Cellular systems are growing into their fifth generation (5G). Trials of 5G technologies are already underway and extensive deployments of 5G are expected in the coming years. In this webinar, I explain several new revolutionary applications of cellular communication, which place new requirements on the design of 5G. These applications involve vehicular- and aerial-to-everything communications for mobile robots, or ultra-reliable low rate communications in the context of IoT. Then I describe different technical elements of 5G enabling these new applications. Some examples of these technologies are massive MIMO, millimeter wave communication, or network slicing. Finally, I categorize these technologies based on how much they disrupt 4G thinking.

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